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The Evolution of a Rider's Stable - Part 2: A Mechanical Titanium Mosaic

by Derek Yarra |  | 

N+1, the famed equation for the optimal number bikes in our collection. No matter how content we are with what we're riding, each bike is a learning experience, and as our tastes refine, there's always the fantasy of the next project build. Sometimes that equation needs to be altered to fit our reality, and as many of us know all to well, we need to subtract a bike from the stable before having space to add one. This week we continue our story on the evolution of a rider's stable, and reveal how things shift around to make way for something new.

evolution of a riders bike stable

Alongside the Pegoretti we covered last week our rider had also taken in a Baum Corretto a couple years back. A titanium machine with Sram electronic shifting seemed like a perfect companion to the steel Peg with mechanical shifting, bringing a different ride feel and a change in the shifting interface. He actually purchased the Baum from our demo fleet, as a way to get a taste for titanium that we've longed raved about. The Corretto was a phenomenal bike, but like we said, each bike is a learning experience. Through is time on the Baum, he realized the love to titanium, but developed a desire for a bike built specifically just for him, and had a realization that mechanical shifting was more to his liking. The time had come for the Baum to go (it's actually available now on our sale bike page) to make way for something new.

The replacement? A brand new Mosaic RT-2 fresh from Boulder, Co. While the RT-1 is the flagship offering from Mosaic's line up, he didn't necessarily need full custom geo, and his appeal to the aesthetics of the smaller tube diameters and non oversized head tube made the 2 series a perfect choice. One upgrade from the standard RT-2 was the acrtic white paint job for a clean, classic look.

mosaic RT-2 frameset

Freshly pulled from the Pegoretti, this Sram Red 22 group was ready for its new life too. Cleaned and revitalized to look and work like new, the Mosaic was ready to come to life.

Sram Red parts on bench

 

mosaic RT2 white against wall

We've been fans of Deda components for years. The latest generation of Super Leggero was a perfect fit for this RT build. The slender profile of the Superleggero RS stem nicely compliments the smaller tubes and straight 1 1/8th head tube while the 42c carbon bar is light and comfortable. While the front end is stealthy and all black, we went for the Team carbon seatpost for that little extra pop of white that ties in nicely with the frame. 

deda superleggero cockpit

There's something about the feeling of mechanical Sram Red that eTap just doesn't quite replicate. Don't get us wrong, we love the modern AXS electronics kits, but there's nothing like the direct, positive feel of mechanical Red 22, especially on a bike with traditional, external cable routing. That, plus the freedom from batteries and any potential firmware malfunctions. Sure, the Quarq power meter uses a battery, but if that dies it won't stop you from riding. While much of the group was carried over from the Pegoretti,  we of course built the bike with a new chain and fresh cables and housing. 

sram red 22 drive train mosaic RT2

These wheels are awesome. The Corima 47s are such a fantastic riding wheel, and being laced to Chris King R45s makes them all the sweeter. Sadly, they Corima rims have been harder and harder to get here in the US, so we haven't built with them as much in recent times. Luckily they're plenty durable, and ready to cary over for a new life on this Mosaic. 

chris king corima 47 wheels mosaic rt2

Of course, no build leaves AC without a spread of rad details. A White Industries headset, titanium King cages, a Ceramicspeed bottom bracket, EE brakes and compression plug, and of course, the custom AC/Prova 3D printed titanium seat post clamp. We're all about the little details...

rt2 details

The final outcome? It was definitely the perfect addition to the collection, even if it meant shuffling parts and letting one go. After years of putting in the miles and refining his tastes, his perfect titanium road bike came out to this.

How have your tastes evolved? What's next in your stable? Do you need to let something go to make it happen? We want to hear from you, so check in and let us know in the comments below! 

mosaic rt2 back angle